Antibiotics resistance in UTIs

June 3, 2020

Antibiotics are one of our most powerful tools for fighting life-threatening infections and their discovery has transformed human and animal health. However, antibiotic resistance (the ability of germs to defeat the drugs designed to kill them) is one of the greatest global public health challenges of our time.

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Topics: Urinary Tract Infection (UTI), Science Article

The real risk factors for severe, febrile UTIs in SCI patients

May 13, 2020

In the current article the risk profiles are defined for frequent and/or severe febrile UTIs requiring hospital treatment. From the results obtained in this study a basic strategy for treatment of symptomatic infections is formulated.

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Topics: Urinary Tract Infection (UTI), Catheter-associated UTI (CAUTI)

Which bladder management method is best for Urinary Tract Infection prevention

April 14, 2020

Given the great variability in the definitions used to diagnose Urinary Tract Infection (UTI), this review will aid in providing an overview of the joint clinical evidence between the different bladder management methods with regard to UTI risk.

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Topics: Urinary Tract Infection (UTI), Catheter-associated UTI (CAUTI), Bladder management, Intermittent Catheterization

Science Alert: Using cranberry to prevent urinary tract infection (UTI) – an old remedy with new clinical evidence

January 2, 2018

The Cochrane review from 2013 by Jepson et al. 2013 was unable to recommend cranberry juice to prevent urinary tract infection (UTI). They furthermore identified a lack of evidence for the efficacy of other cranberry preparations (such as powders). New studies are, however, continuously added to the total weight of clinical evidence and the latest examples suggest that there may be benefits in this traditional remedy.

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Topics: Science Alert, Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

Science Alert: Children with specific bladder care needs

November 21, 2017

Urinary tract anomalies are sometimes seen in children, and many of them require active treatment to achieve continence. Vesicoureteral reflux and/or a neurogenic bladder secondary to meningomyelocele (e.g. spina bifida) are two examples that require swift action.

Catheterization is sometimes a suitable solution and new research has studied the need for local anesthetic associated with catheterization. A meta-analysis combined many study results and concluded that the effect of local anesthetic was limited.

Sometimes, catheterization is not possible through the urethra and a continent catheterizable channel is surgically created. Different procedures (e.g. Mitrofanoff) can be used and two new studies look into the complications associated with this kind of surgery. Both studies conclude that surgical procedures should only be used in children who cannot perform urethral catheterization, because surgical revisions and long-term complications are common.

Another, maybe more far-fetched, solution to these children's problems is the use of stem cell therapy. A new review summarizes the available evidence for stem cell therapy and show that the use of bone marrow stem cells has potential in bladder tissue regeneration.

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Topics: Science Alert, Urinary Tract Infection (UTI), Neurogenic bladder, Catheter-associated UTI (CAUTI)