Burden of illness the first year after diagnosed bladder dysfunction among people with spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis – a Danish register study

September 13, 2022

People living with spinal cord injury (SCI) or multiple sclerosis (MS) often encounter bladder and bowel dysfunction. Urinary and bowel dysfunction have a significantly negative impact on the patients’ quality of life, by limiting social and physical activities. These problems often become more severe with increasing disability and in addition poses major costs to the society.

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Topics: Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), MS

It's time to stop ignoring major patient groups

January 11, 2022

For a successful therapy, it’s important to find out the patients’ actual experiences when performing intermittent catheterization (IC). But a lack of research can provide obstacles. Have we heard directly from the patient about the difficulties they face when approaching IC?

A recent study seeks to remedy this neglect in research; it involved a total of 200 adults who had independently been performing IC for at least 6 months across the US.

 

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Topics: Urinary Tract Infection (UTI), Neurogenic bladder, Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), Parkinsons disease, Intermittent Catheterization, multiple sclerosis

Efficacy of TAI with Navina Smart

June 8, 2021

Emmanuel et al, PLoS One 2021. The use of transanal irrigation (TAI) with Navina™ Smart, is an effective and well tolerated treatment for bowel dysfunction.

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Topics: Bowel management, Transanal irrigation (TAI), Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), Neurogenic bowel, Bowel dysfunction, Fecal incontinence, constipation

Survey: Fear of infection among SCI injured during COVID-19

May 27, 2020

This is the first publication that assess the number one concern individuals with spinal cord injury or disorder (SCI/D) may have related to the COVID-19 pandemic. The data spans over six continents and describes the vulnerable situation for these individuals in the pandemic crisis.

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Topics: Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), @Coronavirus

Science Alert: Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction from 3 perspectives - spinal cord injury, spina bifida, and multiple sclerosis.

January 30, 2019

One common reason behind lower urinary tract dysfunction is neurological damage secondary to spinal cord injury (SCI), spina bifida, or multiple sclerosis. Even though the everyday situation is different for people living with these conditions, they share many problems linked to their bladder.

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Topics: Neurogenic bladder, Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), Multiple Sklerose (MS)