Life controlled by bladder and bowel

December 22, 2020

Bladder and bowel symptoms are known to reduce quality of life and are rated a severe life problem in persons with SCI. This study was undertaken to identify women’s experiences living with spinal cord injury and neurogenic bladder and bowel.

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Topics: Bladder and bowel interaction, Neurogenic bladder, Neurogenic bowel, Women's health, quality of life

Life enhancing bladder and bowel interventions starts with the patient

December 15, 2020

Neurogenic bladder and bowel dysfunction has a significant impact on quality of life and well-being. To increase quality of life, treatments should be based on patient reported outcomes. Read more about this and other conclusions in a literature review by Patel et al.


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Topics: Bladder and bowel interaction, Neurogenic bladder, Neurogenic bowel, quality of life

Challenges related to intermittent catherization

November 17, 2020

Prior to the LoFric Elle webinar in September, we had a great opportunity to talk to Susanne Vahr Lauridsen about the barriers related to intermittent catheterization and dignity. We also asked for her opinion on LoFric Elle’s potential to provide new opportunities for women facing challenges when performing IC.

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Topics: Neurogenic bladder, Bladder dysfunction, dignity, Lofric Elle

Almost two thirds (66%) of nurses in a US survey did not base their practice on clinical guidelines.

September 15, 2020

Intermittent catheterization (IC) is frequently used to manage lower urinary tract dysfunctions, but research shows that care for patients using IC may not always be based on evidence. The purpose of this review was to summarize evidence related to adherence to IC, complication rates, satisfaction with IC, and its effect on health-related quality of life.

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Topics: Neurogenic bladder, Spina Bifida, Intermittent Catheterization

Science Alert: Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction from 3 perspectives - spinal cord injury, spina bifida, and multiple sclerosis.

January 30, 2019

One common reason behind lower urinary tract dysfunction is neurological damage secondary to spinal cord injury (SCI), spina bifida, or multiple sclerosis. Even though the everyday situation is different for people living with these conditions, they share many problems linked to their bladder.

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Topics: Neurogenic bladder, Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), Multiple Sclerosis (MS)