Science Alert: Spina bifida – children and young adults with specific needs

Posted by Sofi Sigvardsson, January 24, 2017

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Bladder and bowel control has the potential of being a quiet distress throughout life for children and young adults with Spina Bifida. There are a few recent articles reviewing and investigating different aspects of bladder and bowel management therapy in this group.

You will find a summary from these articles in this blog post!

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Spina Bifida is a birth defect with a great variation of symptoms between individuals. Many of the patients have physical signs such as leg weakness or paralysis and bladder and bowel control problems, among other issues.

As there is no cure, there is a need to consider the child, adolescent and adult patient’s different concerns in life. It is of highest importance that both bladder and bowel management therapy is re-evaluated on a continuing basis and adapted to the growing persons needs in life.

These articles cover different aspects of bladder and bowel management in young people with Spina Bifida.


Highlight article: Consensus review of best practice of transanal irrigation in children

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27977546

Author and Origin

Mosiello G, Marshall D, Rolle U, Cretolle C, Santacruz B, Frischer J, Benninga M. EU and US.

Summary

A review gathering all clinical data on transanal irrigation (TAI) in children.It also concludes a consensus of best practice with a suggested treatment pyramid.

Conclusions

The most important aspects for a successful outcome with TAI in children are careful patient selection, a tailored approach, directly supervised training, and sustained follow-up.

Comments

A review of TAI in children with considerations of best practice.

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Barriers to transition in young adults with neurogenic bladder

http://www.jpurol.com/article/S1477-5131(16)30041-9/abstract

Author and Origin

Grimsby GM, Burgess R, Culver S, Schlomer BJ, Jacobs MA. US.

Summary

Observational survey evaluating barriers in transition to independent care. 79 young adults with neurogenic bladder (e.g. spina bifida) were included.

Conclusions

The majority of patients (73%) followed routines in transitional care. Among those who missed clinic appointments, health insurance coverage related reasons were common (47%).

Comments

Study indicating that young adults with spina bifida need guidance during transition to independent care.


Risk Factors Associated with Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection in Neurogenic Bladders Managed by Clean Intermittent Catheterization

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28065810

Author and Origin

Chaudhry R, Balsara ZR, Madden-Fuentes RJ, Wiener JS, Routh JC, Seed P, Ross SS. UK.

Summary

Observational retrospective study of urinary tract infection (UTI) risk patterns in 194 patients with neurogenic bladder secondary to spina bifida/tethered cord.

Conclusions

Frequent (>1.0 UTI/study-year) infections were observed in 25% of the patients. They were more common in younger patients and in those with higher level lesions. The UTI risk was found to decrease by 7% every year.

Comments

Study exploring UTI risk factors associated with intermittent catheter use among spina bifida patients. Age was identified as the most important UTI risk factor.


 

Don't forget to download the highlight article - consensus review of best practice of transanal irrigation in children.

Download Publication Highlight

This blog post is an extract from the Science Alert from January 2017 (76040-USX-1701)

Topics: Science Alert, Neurogenic bladder, Spina Bifida, Neurogenic bowel