Science Alert: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) – Stem cell therapy and symptom control

Posted by Maria Åberg Håkansson, April 11, 2017

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Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease. This means that the immune system attacks the central nervous system and causes nerve damage and communication breakdown between brain and body.

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Symptoms involve several areas, the most common involving problems with mobility, dexterity, body pain, sensation, bladder function, fatigue, vision, dizziness, cognition, depression, and anxiety. The severity of the illness often drives research and many new and exciting studies are available.

In this month’s science alert, we present studies investigating both experimental treatment and evaluation tools for MS. It also highlights bladder problems in general and nocturia in particular associated to MS.

You will find a summary from these articles in this blog post! 


High-dose immunosuppressive therapy and autologous HCT for relapsing-remitting MS.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28148635

Author and Origin

Nash RA, Hutton GJ, Racke MK, Popat U, Devine SM, Steinmiller KC, Grif th LM, Muraro PA, Openshaw H, Sayre PH, Stuve O, Arnold DL, Wener MH, Georges GE, Wundes A, Kraft GH, Bowen JD. US

Summary

Observational prospective study of 24 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients who were given a combination therapy with stem cells and immunosuppression.

Conclusions

5 years after the procedure, 69% of the participants showed no signs of progression. Improvements in neurological disability were seen. Three participants had disease progression and died during the study period.

Comments

Study showing promising results on MS remission after 5 years of treatment with an experimental therapy combination of stem cells and immunosuppressive drugs.

  


SymptoMScreen: A Tool for Rapid Assessment of Symptom Severity in MS Across Multiple Domains.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23279095.2015.1125905

Author and Origin 

Green R, Kalina J, Ford R, Pandey K, Kister I. US

Summary

Descriptive study and validation of a new tool (SymptoMScreen) for rapid assessment of multiple sclerosis (MS) symptoms.

Conclusions

SymptoMScreen was found to be valid, patient/clinician friendly, and quick (about 1 min). It covers mobility, dexterity, body pain, sensation, bladder function, fatigue, vision, dizziness, cognition, depression, and anxiety associated with MS.

Comments

Study describing a new valid and quick tool for assessing MS symptoms.

  


Nocturnal Urinary Disorders and Multiple Sclerosis: Clinical and Urodynamic Study of 309 Patients.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27816615

Author and Origin

Mauruc E, Guinet-Lacoste A, Falcou L, Manceau P, Verollet D, Le Breton F, Amarenco G. France

Summary

Observational retrospective study of 309 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and urinary symptoms.

Conclusions

A total of 53.3% had nocturia, and 35.7% had nocturnal urinary incontinence, which is considered a frequent problem associated with MS. Overactive bladder is suggested as the reason behind the observations.

Comments

Study highlighting the common problems with nocturia associated with MS.

  


Bladder dysfunction in multiple sclerosis: a 6-year follow-up study.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpurol.2016.12.030

Author and Origin 

Kisic Tepavcevic D, Pekmezovic T, Dujmovic Basuroski I, Mesaros S, Drulovic J. Serbia

Summary

Observational prospective study of bladder dysfunction in 93 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), including a 6-year follow-up.

Conclusions

Bladder dysfunction seemed to increase over time, affecting:

  • 48.1% men/45.5% women at baseline
  • 51.9% men/50.0% women after 3 years
  • 71.4% men/66.7% women after 6 years.

The most common symptom was urgency of urination.

Comments

Study showing prevalence of bladder dysfunction among men and women with MS.

 

 


 Download Science Alert - March 2017 


This blog post is an extract of the Science Alert from March 2017 (76040-USX-1703)

Topics: Science Alert, Multiple Sclerosis (MS)