Science Alert: Management of the neurogenic bladder – now and then

Posted by Maria Åberg Håkansson, February 1, 2017

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Lower urinary tract symptoms are common after nerve damage and a new review summarizes the treatment forms and reasons behind it in patients with Parkinson disease. One of the treatment options available is intermittent catheterization.

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Intermittent catheterization revolutionized the management of the neurogenic bladder in the late 1970s, in many cases replacing the need for surgery. Throughout the years, the therapy and the catheters have evolved and there is newly published research supporting the cost-effectiveness of hydrophilic coated catheters for intermittent catheterization.

You will find a summary from these articles in this blog post! 


The Retrograde Idea of Jack Lapides: Clean Intermittent Catheterization.

http://www.jurology.com/article/S0022-5347(16)31867-5/fulltext

Author and Origin

Bloom DA. US.

Summary

Editorial describing the introduction of clean intermittent catheterization into clinical practice.

Conclusions

Introducing intermittent catheterization for use by patients in their home setting was groundbreaking in the late 1970s, replacing urinary diversion as the routine approach to managing the neuropathic bladder.

Comments

The Journal of Urology sheds new light on when intermittent catheterization was introduced as a general practice therapy in the 1970s.


Intermittent catheterisation with hydrophilic and non-hydrophilic urinary catheters: systematic
literature review and meta-analyses.

https://bmcurol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12894-016-0191-1

Author and Origin 

Rognoni C, Tarricone R. Italy.

Summary

Review comparing hydrophilic to non-hydrophilic coated catheters for intermittent catheterization.

Conclusions

Hydrophilic coated catheters for intermittent catheterization were found to reduce the risk of urinary tract infection (UTI).

Comments

Meta-analysis verifying previous findings of UTI risk reduction associated with use of hydrophilic-coated catheters for intermittent catheterization. (Further described in the highlight section. Open access.)

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Prevalence and treatment of LUTS in patients with Parkinson disease or multiple system atrophy.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27958390

Author and Origin

Ogawa T, Sakakibara R, Kuno S, Ishizuka O, Kitta T, Yoshimura N. Japan.

Summary

Review of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and their treatment in Parkinson disease or multiple system atrophy.

Conclusions

Patients with Parkinson disease or multiple system atrophy often have LUTS related to overactive bladder and voiding difficulties. Exact prevalence in Parkinson disease is not established but was reported to vary between 27 and 70%.

Comments

Review summarizing the need for treatment of LUTS in patients with Parkinson disease or multiple system atrophy. Anticholinergics and intermittent catheterization are among the treatment options.


 

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This blog post is an extract from the Science Alert from January 2017 (76040-USX-1701)

Topics: Science Alert, Neurogenic bladder