Science Alert: Living with a Spinal Cord Injury

Posted by Maria Åberg Håkansson, January 26, 2017

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There is no doubt that physical disability is of central concern for a person with spinal cord injury. Recent research however highlights that less evident problems are more common, such as bowel and bladder issues. 

This might be the reason why many treatment forms and research studies are addressing these problems. 

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Two recently published studies spread some light into this area and present result on cost-effective bladder treatment forms and how bowel physiology is affected from nerve damage.

You will find a summary from these articles in this blog post! 


Factors Affecting Quality of Life Among Spinal Cord Injury Patients in Korea

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5209570/

Author and Origin

Lee JS, Kim SW, Jee SH, Kim JC, Choi JB, Cho SY, Kim JH; Korea Spinal Cord Injury Association. Korea

Summary

Observational survey of 299 patients with spinal cord injury investigating factors affecting their quality of life.

Conclusions

Urinary problems such as incontinence and infections were commonly reported, and identi ed as areas for improvement. 67% used intermittent catheterization and 63% voiding-related medications.

Comments

Survey verifying that urological and bowel problems are common in people with spinal cord injury, and that they cause trouble in addition to the patients’ physical disability. Open access.


[Medico-economic evaluation of urological cares of spinal cord injured patients: A review]

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27988174

Author and Origin

Guillot-Tantay C, Chartier-Kastler E, Manach Q, Perrouin-Verbe MA, Denys P, Phé V. France

Summary

Cost-effectiveness analysis of anticholinergic drugs and Botox for treatment of neurogenic overactive bladder secondary to spinal cord injury.

Conclusions

The anticholinergic drug Solifenacin and botulinum toxin A appeared to be the most cost-effective treatments.

Comments

Cost-effectiveness analysis showing evidence supporting the use of speci c anticholinergic drugs and Botox in treatment of overactive bladder after spinal cord injury. [Article in French].


The enteric nervous system and the musculature of the colon are altered in patients with spina bifda and spinal cord injury

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28062917

Author and Origin

den Braber-Ymker M, Lammens M, van Putten M, Nagtegaal I. The Netherlands.

Summary

This study investigates histological alterations of the neuromuscular apparatus in the colon following spina bifida (SB) or spinal cord injury (SCI).

Conclusions

Impaired extrinsic innervation affects neuromuscular structures which may contribute to decreased bowel motility. Also, nerve fiber density was decreased in the symptomatic SB and SCI groups with major motility problems.

Comments

Basic histological research of the effect on neuromuscular structure from loss of innervation of the colon.


This blog post is an extract from the Science Alert from January 2017 (76040-USX-1701)

Topics: Science Alert, Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)