Science Alert: Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI) – Success Stories

Posted by Maria Åberg Håkansson, August 29, 2017

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New success stories are being published every month on how to reduce the burden of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI).

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The vast majority of studies share successful results from prevention programs and show a significant CAUTI reduction of 9% per year or even higher depending on the method used. The most important part of the solution is to restrict the use of indwelling catheters.

One study from an American hospital shows that indwelling catheter use declined by 35% as a result of targeting this problem. Part of the solution was to empower nurses to choose bladder scanners in combination with intermittent catheterization on demand to manage cases of urinary retention, instead of routinely inserting an indwelling catheter.

These successful reports are good news for the future as fighting CAUTI and reducing this common infection is key to overcoming the development of antibiotic resistant bacteria.

Download Science Alert – July 2017 


National trends in the frequency of bladder catheterization and physician-diagnosed catheterassociated urinary tract infections: Results from the Medicare Patient Safety Monitoring System.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28625702

Author and Origin

Metersky ML, Eldridge N, Wang Y, Mortensen EM, Meddings J. US

Summary

Observational retrospective study of bladder catheterization frequency and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) frequency in hospitalized patients between 2009 and 2014 in the US.

Conclusions

Data suggests that adjusted CAUTI frequency declines with decreasing bladder catheterization frequency. For some patient groups the decline in CAUTI rates was about 9% per year.

Comments

Study indicating promising results from targeted CAUTI prevention programs.

  


Decreasing Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections in the Neurological Intensive Care Unit: One Unit’s Success.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28572100

Author and Origin 

Richards B, Sebastian B, Sullivan H, Reyes R, D’Agostino JF, Hagerty T. US

Summary

Observational retrospective study investigating the impact of implementing strategies to combat catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) in a neurological intensive care unit.

Conclusions

The number of CAUTIs reduced from 40 events in 2012 to 15 events in 2014. The implementation of nurse-led CAUTI prevention strategies was identified as a possible cause of the reduction.

Comments

Study showing an example of successful strategies for reducing CAUTIs at a neurological intensive care unit.

 


A multifaceted quality improvement strategy reduces the risk of catheter-associated urinary tract infection.

https://academic.oup.com/intqhc/article-abstract/doi/10.1093/intqhc/mzx073/3869518/A-multifaceted-quality-improvement-strategy?redirectedFrom=fulltext

Author and Origin 

Theobald CN, Resnick MJ, Spain T, Dittus RS, Roumie CL. US

Summary

Observational study of the implementation of a multifaceted program to reduce catheter use and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) rates.

Conclusions

Catheter use declined by 35% as a result of e.g. empowering nurses to use intermittent catheterization and existing bladder scanners to manage urinary retention.

Comments

Study showing an example of successful strategies for reducing catheter use and CAUTIs.

  


  Download Science Alert – July 2017


This blog post is an extract of the Science Alert from July 2017 (76070-USX-1707)

Topics: Science Alert, Catheter-associated UTI (CAUTI)